Nettles
 

  Be Nice to Nettles Week
  a CONE initiative
Nettles
 
“This is another clever initiative from CONE. It makes us think twice about the common yet important wildlife on our doorstep.

At Butterfly Conservation, being nice to nettles comes as second nature to us - we love them! Not only are nettles good for butterflies like Red Admiral, Comma and Peacock, they also have so much to offer to other wildlife. Our thanks go to CONE for increasing our awareness of this familiar and incredibly useful plant.”

Charlie Rugeroni
Butterfly Conservation - the leading organisation for the conservation of butterflies nationally

 

 
 
 

Burnished Brass - Diachrysia chrysitis

 Burnished Brass - Diachrysia chrysitis 
 Copyright David G Green
© David G Green
The metallic patches on the upper wing make the Burnished Brass easily identifiable.

A common moth throughout the British Isles, the Burnished Brass can be found in a variety of habitats from woodland to wasteland and gardens. It can sometimes be seen feeding from Buddleia around dusk.

The larvae hatch from their eggs in late summer, feed for a while and then hibernate when quite small in the leaf litter at the base of the foodplant. The caterpillars resume feeding in April and completes its growth by the end of May. The caterpillar then forms a cocoon on the underside of a leaf folding the edges of the leaf around it as it progresses. The adults then emerge about four weeks later.

Back to moths of the nettle patch

 

 
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Did you know?
The Latin name of the nettle Urtica comes from the word 'uro' which means to burn!
 
 
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