Be Nice to Nettles Week
  a CONE initiative
“Within the Buckingham Palace gardens nettles play an important role in the wildlife habitat areas providing a valuable food source for caterpillars. I hope National Be Nice to Nettles Week is a great success and congratulate CONE on this exciting initiative.”

Mark Lane
Head Gardener, Buckingham Palace



Burnished Brass - Diachrysia chrysitis

 Burnished Brass - Diachrysia chrysitis 
 Copyright David G Green
© David G Green
The metallic patches on the upper wing make the Burnished Brass easily identifiable.

A common moth throughout the British Isles, the Burnished Brass can be found in a variety of habitats from woodland to wasteland and gardens. It can sometimes be seen feeding from Buddleia around dusk.

The larvae hatch from their eggs in late summer, feed for a while and then hibernate when quite small in the leaf litter at the base of the foodplant. The caterpillars resume feeding in April and completes its growth by the end of May. The caterpillar then forms a cocoon on the underside of a leaf folding the edges of the leaf around it as it progresses. The adults then emerge about four weeks later.

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Did you know?
Native American braves would flog themselves with nettles to keep themselves awake while on watch.
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